India

Satish Prakash Qamar

Music Genre: 
Hindustani music
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Shehnai

Dhrupad

Dhrupad (Hindi: ध्रुपद) is a vocal genre in Hindustani (North Indian Classical) music, said to be the oldest still in use in that musical tradition. Its name is derived from the words "dhruva" (fixed) and "pada" (words). The term may denote both the verse form of the poetry and the style in which it is sung.

Abul Fazl, courtier and chronicler at the court of the Emperor Akbar, defines the dhrupad verse form in his Ain-e-Akbari as "four rhyming lines, each of indefinite prosodic length." Thematic matter ranges from the religious and spiritual (mostly in praise of Hindu deities) to royal panegyrics, musicology and romance. In Dhrupad, words are set to a fixed repeating pattern. Dhrupad compositions are generally delivered in a slow tempo and use little ornamentation; occasionally, rhythmic variations are added and songs are presented in double, triple or even quadruple tempos.

Electric mandolin

Electric mandolin

The electric mandolin was first introduced into Indian classical music by U. Srinivas, who performed Carnatic music.

The style of playing is significantly different from its western counterpart. For one, it is played while sitting on the floor, just like all other Indian classical instruments. Secondly, wide bends are also played on the instruments by sliding the fingertip along the strings and over the frets: as this is a key feature in Carnatic music, it is a central playing technique on the electric mandolin.

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Carnatic music
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Thursday 24th February 2011: Successful conclusion of the AMC Winter School 2011

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Pandit Ulhas Kashalkar, Pandit Suresh Talwalkar and Ajay Joglekar departed London today for Kolkata and Mumbai after a successful stay in Europe, where they gave concerts in the UK  and abroad and taught at the AMC Winter School 2011. The courses in khyal singing and tabla were well-attended (by participants aged three years upwards!) and the London concert was a sold-out success. We look forward to welcoming the musicians back again in future. 

Qawwali

Qawwali (Nastaʿlīq: قوّالی; Gurmukhī: ਕੱ਼ਵਾਲੀ; Devanāgarī: क़व्वाली) is a form of Sufi devotional music popular in South Asia, particularly in the Punjab and Sindh regions of Pakistan, Hyderabad, Delhi, and other parts of northern India. It is a musical tradition that stretches back more than 700 years.

Originally performed mainly at Sufi shrines or dargahs throughout South Asia, it has now gained mainstream popularity. Qawwali music received international exposure through the work of the late Pakistani singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, largely due to several releases on the Real World label, followed by live appearances at WOMAD festivals. Other famous Qawwali singers include Pakistan's Sabri Brothers, Bahauddin Qutbuddin and Aziz Mian.

Daf

Daf

The daf is a circular frame drum found in the Middle East, Pakistan, Turkey, Tajikistan, Azerbaijan and India. Covered with animal skin on one side (usually goat), and sometimes equipped with rings or small cymbals, the percussion instrument has characteristics similar to that of a tambourine. Striking the instrument in different spots with the fingers produces a variety of tones and colours.

Performance techniques vary from country to country, however its soft, deep sonorous tone makes the instrument ubiquitous with vocal accompaniment.

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Afghan rubab

rubab

The Afghan rubab is a lute-like instrument originating in Afghanistan.

However, its name as well as its shape suggests that it may have evolved from the rebab, a bowed instrument. Typically, the Afghan rubab is carved out of a single piece of wood, with a membrane covering the hollow sound-chamber. The wood is taken from a Mulberry tree, the skin is usually goat skin and the strings are made from gut. The rubab can also be found in the mountainous regions of Pakistan and India. The tone of the Afghan rubab is extremely warm and beautiful.

 
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Thumri

Thumri (Devnagari: ठुमरी, Nastaliq: ٹھمری) is a common genre of semi-classical Indian music.

The text is romantic or devotional in nature, and usually revolves around a girl's love for Krishna. The lyrics are usually in Uttar Pradesh dialects of Hindi called Poorbi and Brij Bhasha. Thumri is characterized by its sensuality, and by a greater flexibility with the raga.

Thumri is also used as a generic name for some other, even lighter, forms such as Dadra, Hori, Kajari, Saavan, Jhoola, and Chaiti, even though each of them has its own structure and content — either lyrical or musical or both — and so the exposition of these forms vary. Like Indian classical music itself, some of these forms have their origin in folk literature and music.

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