India

Nizami Brothers

Following the success of the Nizami Brother's debut UK in 2004, the singers return their cousins from Pakistan spirit of friendship and co-operation between India and Pakistan. The group perform devotional music rooted in the Sufi mystical traditions which is both lyrical and vitally rhythmic.
 

Instrument: 
Ensemble
Related Musicians: 

Mrigya

Enter the global sound world of Mrigya, a unique fusion band from Delhi which presents a rich blend of blues, funk, latino and Indian Classical music. Mrigya stretches the boundaries of music with a sound that unites the world as one family, a philosophy which is demonstrated in the term “Vasudhaiv Kutumbakam”. Mrigya became the first Indian band to get a 4 star rating with the Scotsman at the 2001 Edinburgh Fringe Festival.
 

Music Genre: 
Fusion music
Instrument: 
Ensemble

Amit Mukerjee

Music Genre: 
Hindustani music

Piu Sarkhel

In Piu Sarkhel, we have a young lady who has learnt from her father Sri Kamal Bannerjee and has been totally inspired by one of the greatest singers of our generation Ustad Amir Khan who stayed at their home in Kolkata on many occassions. She has therefore imbibed the AMIR KHANI GAYAKI - style, which was characterized by a superb sense of ease and pace from meditative to the highly virtuosic and she sings his compositions. Blessed with a superb voice, with a fantastic technique, Piu is also one of those rare artists who is able to articulate in English and can talk about her music as well as perform it with equal ease.
 

Music Genre: 
Hindustani music
Related Musicians: 

Hanif Khan

Hanif Khan is the son and disciple of the illustrious and highly renowned master of tabla, Ustad Hidayat Khan. He has inherited a rich legacy of gats and bols (compositions) from his father under the traditional Indian Classical learning system. Since teenager, he has toured extensively in small and large ensembles. Although an accomplished classically trained tabla player, earning the respect of both Indian classical and semi classical artists, Hanif also has an expert touch for the light genres including lok geet , bhajans , folk and western fusion styles.

Currently Hanif is considered one of the top tabla players in the UK and is a regularly sought after accompanist at the Nehru Centre, Mayfair for visiting Indian artists. Hanif's musical career has taken him across the world both as an accompanist and solo performer. This includes visits to the US, Canada, Israel, Jordan, Belgium, Italy, France, Germany, Switzerland, Czech Republic and Spain.

Accompanist to

Pt Arvind Parikh (sitar) - Purcell Room
Ustadh Fateh Ali Khan (vocal) - Purcell Room
Gulam Ali (ghazal) -Queen Elizabeth Hall
Wajahat Khan (sarod) with Sinfonia Verdi - St Albans
Hariharran (ghazal) - SOAS
Nirmal Udas (ghazal) various venues - London
Ustadh Gulam Mustafa Khan (vocal) - London
Sanjeev & Karuna (ghazal) US National Public Radio - Arizona
Pt Arvind Parikh (sitar) Radio France
Ustadh Nishad Khan (sitar) private audience for Paul McCartney – India
Nicolas Magriel (sarangi) British Museum
“DHA” an Indian/ western jazz improvisation ensemble currently playing various UK venues
Sunanda Sjarma-Purcell Roompart of the AMC's 2004 “The little Chilli Festival”
Festivals

Israel - Mevaserat Festival Solo Performance
Israel - Arat Festival Solo Performance
Jordan - UN Festival of Music Petra
UK - Womad Festival accompanied Purbayan Chatterjee
Numerous Italian festivals with Indo-European Music Ensemble
Workshop/ Masterclass

Sitar accompaniment with Pt Arvind Parikh – Canada, Jordan, Leeds School of Music & SOAS

Sitar accompaniment with Ustadh Nishad Khan Victoria & Albert Museum

Mr Hanif Khan has also taught at various workshops and schools across UK.
 

Music Genre: 
Hindustani music
Instrument: 
Tabla

Uday Bhawalker

Dhrupad is believed to be the oldest surviving form of North Indian classical vocal music, dating back to the 15th century. An austere and highly spiritual form, dhrupad has enjoyed a revival of popularity in recent years.

Uday Bhawalkar is a respected dhrupad singer, from the long-standing Dagar gharana. He has performed at many prominent music festivals in India and abroad and has taught at the Rotterdam Conservatorium, the World Music School in Amsterdam and at the Asian Music Summer School 2000 and 2001.
 

Music Genre: 
Hindustani music

Sunanda Sharma

Often described as a ‘light' or ‘semi-classical' style, thumri is nevertheless a demanding and highly refined genre. Thumri developed in Lucknow during the early 19th century AD, and is now a popular art form. Much emphasis is placed on the subtle expression of emotions inherent in the song-texts, and their musical manipulation by the singer.

Sunanda Sharma is a fine classical singer and teacher and young star of the Benares gharana, who has gained her knowledge and experience from the great Smt Girija Devi. This year she is returning to teach a range of thumri and light classical vocal music.

Music Genre: 
Hindustani music
Music Genre: 
Thumri

Ronu Majumdar

Pandit Ronu Majumdar is one of India's foremost exponents of the bansuri or bamboo flute. He was born in Varanasi in 1963 and first studied the flute under his father Dr Bhanu Majumdar. Ronu then went to study vocal music with Pandit Laxman Prasad Jaipurwale, returning in due course to the flute, this time under flute master Pandit Vijay Raghav Rao.

Ronu is today a much sought-after musician. He represents the Mahar gharana, which created such illustrious musicians such as Pandit Ravi Shankar and Ustad Ali Akbar Khan. His imagination, versatility and virtuosity are compelling and make Ronu irresistible to listeners and devotees of North Indian Music.
 

Music Genre: 
Fusion music
Music Genre: 
Hindustani music
Instrument: 
Bansuri
Related Musicians: 

Ram Narayan

Pandit Ram Narayan is one of the most outstanding musicians of our time. From Udaipur in Rajasthan he learned first from his father, the late Pandit Nathuji Biawat. In the early part of his career he developed his knowledge and technique as an accompanist to many great singers and acquired for himself a fine reputation in that role

However, feeling that his own creative instincts were not being given adequate opportunity, he decided in the early 1950's to develop his career as a soloist, and thereby established the sarangi as a solo instrument.

Anyone who listens to Ram Narayan knows well the phenomenal technique that he has in his hands, acquired after years of rigorous and disciplined practice. He modified the sarangi and added new methods of bowing and finger techniques and these are now regarded by performers and students alike as standard practice. His genius has rightly been recognised through the many awards he has received including the Padmabhushan and the Sangeet Natak Academy Award.
 

Music Genre: 
Hindustani music
Instrument: 
Sarangi
Related Musicians: 

Musicians from Rajasthan

Rajasthan, the "land of the rulers", is considered one of the most romantic of Indian states, and it is also the home of some of the sub-continent's most beautiful music. Alongside the magical palaces of these princely rulers there developed a rich village tradition, with folk musicians performing for themselves, and also for their patrons on all occasions: life-cycle ceremonies; music associated with the temples, with regional themes, and with heroic figures. Their songs told of love and war, of longing and separation, of victory and in praise of God, and of social issues such as the value of their animals (especially camels) to their way of life.

The music was traditionally learnt by imitation and in the oral tradition, but with industrialisation, migration, advanced communications, and now globalisation, traditional music has been endangered. In these circumstances it is heartening to find there is a strong revival of the traditional music, and the wonderful talent, skill and sheer joy of many young musicians is witness to this.
 

Instrument: 
Ensemble
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