Turkey

Surnay

Surnay

The surnay (also called zurna, birbynė, lettish horn, surla, sornai, dili tuiduk, zournas or zurma) is a multinational outdoor wind instrument, usually accompanied by a davul (bass drum) in Anatolian folk music. The name is from Turkish zurna, itself derived from Persian سرنای ('surnāy'), composed of سور ('sūr':  'banquet, feast') and نای ('nāy': 'reed, pipe').

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Saz

Saz

The saz (from the Persian ساز‎, meaning 'kit' or 'set') or bağlama (from the Turkish bağlamak, 'to tie') is a plucked stringed musical instrument shared by various cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean, Near East, and Central Asia.

 

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Ney

Ney

The ney (Persian: نی/نای; Arabic: ناي‎; Turkish: ney; also nai, nye, nay, gagri tuiduk, or karghy tuiduk) is an end-blown flute that figures prominently in Middle Eastern music. In some of these musical traditions, it is the only wind instrument used. It is a very ancient instrument, with depictions of ney players appearing in wall paintings in the Egyptian pyramids and actual neys being found in the excavations at Ur.

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Whirling Dervishes

The practice of whirling is associated with the mystical branch of Islam known as Sufism. In particular, it is said to have begun with the Sufi poet, Jalaluddin Rumi, who entered into trance one day as he was captivated by the pulsating hammering of coblers in a merket place. Spontaneously, he began to whirl. Since then, whirling became one of the tools that Sufis employ to transcend their own Self. Typically, the dervish will be dressed in a white gown, symbolising death, a wide clack cloak, the symbol of a grave and a tall brown hat, symbolising a tombstone.

Fusion music

Fusion music that combines two or more styles. The main characteristics of fusion genres are variations in tempo, rhythm, dynamics, style and tempo. 'Fusion' used alone often refers to jazz fusion, especially with world music.

Fusion music as a genre has broadened the definitions of jazz, rock, and pop music.

Duduk

Duduk

The duduk (Armenian: դուդուկ), traditionally known since antiquity as a Ծիրանափող (tsiranapogh) is a traditional woodwind instrument indigenous to Armenia. Variations of it are popular in the Caucasus, the Middle East and Central Asia.

The English word is often used generically for a family of ethnic instruments including the doudouk (դուդուկ), tsiranapogh ծիրանափող, balaban, mey or narmeh-ney. The word itself is a loanword ultimately derived from the Turkish düdük, likely of onomatopoeic origin. 

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Tambur

Tambur

The tambur or tanbur is a fretted string instrument of Turkey and the former lands of the Ottoman Empire. Like the ney, the armudi kemençe and the kudüm, it constitutes one of the four instruments of the basic quartet of Turkish classical music, Sanat Musiği. Of the two variants, one is played with a plectrum (mızraplı tambur) and the other with a bow (yaylı tambur). A tambur player is known as a tanburî.

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Doira

Doira

The doira (also dayereh, doyra, dojra, dajre or dajreja) is a medium-sized frame drum with jingles, used to accompany both popular and classical music in Iran (Persia), the Balkans, and many Central Asian countries such as Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Afghanistan. Frame drums are also popular in many regions of Georgia, like Kartli, Kakheti, Tusheti, Samegrelo, Racha, and Imereti.

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Persian Classical Music
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Daf
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