Wind

Shehnai

Shehnai

The shehnai, shahnai, shenai or mangal vadya is a double-reed conical oboe common in North India, West India and Pakistan.

A member of the wind family, it is made of a hollow tube of seasoned and resonant wood with a flared metal bell fixed at the end. It is about 50cm long and has seven finger holes.

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Hindustani music

Surnay

Surnay

The surnay (also called zurna, birbynė, lettish horn, surla, sornai, dili tuiduk, zournas or zurma) is a multinational outdoor wind instrument, usually accompanied by a davul (bass drum) in Anatolian folk music. The name is from Turkish zurna, itself derived from Persian سرنای ('surnāy'), composed of سور ('sūr':  'banquet, feast') and نای ('nāy': 'reed, pipe').

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Shinobue

Shinobue

The shinobue is a Japanese transverse flute played in a variety of musical genres, including in Noh and Kabuki theatre music as well as in more ritualistic Shinto music such as Kagura, as well as Japanese folk music.

There are two styles of shinobue: the Uta or 'song' and the Hayashi or 'festival'. The former is suited to solo and ensemble playing, while the latter is more appropriate for festival and folk music, being louder and higher pitched.

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Japanese Classical
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Japanese Folk
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Kagura

Ney

Ney

The ney (Persian: نی/نای; Arabic: ناي‎; Turkish: ney; also nai, nye, nay, gagri tuiduk, or karghy tuiduk) is an end-blown flute that figures prominently in Middle Eastern music. In some of these musical traditions, it is the only wind instrument used. It is a very ancient instrument, with depictions of ney players appearing in wall paintings in the Egyptian pyramids and actual neys being found in the excavations at Ur.

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Klui

Klui

The klui is the Thai flute. It is an end-blown flute, which although originally bamboo, is today usually made of hardwood. The mouthpiece is similar to that found on a western recorder. The klui is capable of a wide variety of tones, created by manipulating the angle at which the air is directed, the pressure of the breath, and the position of the lips.

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Suling

Suling

The suling is an Indonesian flute, usually played as part of a gamelan ensemble. It is made of bamboo and can be heard in Sunda (West Java), Central Java, Bali, Mindanao (Philippines) and Sulu (Philippines).

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Shakuhachi

Shakuhachi

The shakuhachi (尺八) is a Japanese end-blown flute. It is traditionally made of bamboo, but versions now exist in ABS and hardwoods. It was used by the monks of the Fuke school of Zen Buddhism in the practice of suizen (吹禅, 'blowing meditation').

The shakuhachi's soulful sound made it popular in 1980s pop music in the English-speaking world. It is often made in the minor pentatonic scale.

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Japanese Classical
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Japanese Folk
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Harmonium

Harmonium

Although the harmonium was invented in France in the 1840s by Alexandre Debain, it was brought into India by missionaries and thereafter gained enormous popularity in South Asia as an instrument used to accompany vocal music. It is a keyboard instrument and has become very popular in recent years. Used to accompany vocal music, its sound is produced by pumping air through a bellow with one hand whilst the other hand plays the keys.

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Carnatic music
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Hindustani music

Bansuri

Bansuri

The bansuri, also known as murli, is a transverse flute found in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan. It is one of the earliest musical instruments of the subcontinent.

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Mahao

MAHAO
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